The Promise of Dawn, by Lauraine Snelling

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A story about the rough life lived by the daring pioneers of Minnesota. Even though the novel takes place starting in 1909, things were very difficult for this group of Norwegians looking for a better life than what they had in Norway.

You will learn the intimate details of the journey, the settline, the struggles, and the dangers.

Well-written, the plot will keep you turning pages long into the night.

 

Piping Hot, by Susan Hadley Planck

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Piping Hot was written by a relative of my husband. She provided this book for my review. I am glad to have had the opportunity to read this fascinating memoir. I’m guessing here, but the author either has a phenom memory, or some detailed diaries to work from.

Learn about bagpiping as you journey the world in the late 1900s with the irreverant memories of the author.

The Gracious woman blog is written by me, Susan Karsten. I am happy to announce that my first novel, “A Match for Melissa”, has been published by Pelican Book Group! It was released to the public on July 7, and is available on Amazon.com, and Barnes & Noble’s website.

Here’s an excerpt from a recent review:

“A Match for Melissa” is a Regency romance. My acquaintance with this genre is limited so I looked it up. To be a real Regency the novel must be set in early 19th century Britain and have a very defined style. A Regency novel will transport the reader back two hundred years so we know how the characters dressed, what their homes looked like and how they socialized. We see a world with clearly defined social classes, morality, manners and conversation.

The author did her homework. “A Match for Melissa” is chockfull of details on life in rural England and upper class London. The characters are delightful. Unless they are bad. (The bad ones are really wonderfully bad.) Melissa is an intelligent woman with an independent bent to her nature who still functions inside the strict rules of protocol for her class. Her father, also independent, but with greater latitude and freedom than a woman, is in charge not only of the family fortune but also the choice of Melissa’s future husband. Much of the tension comes from wondering when Melissa will be able to be matched with the man she really loves.

Plenty of minor characters add flavor and fun and dimension—the English dressmaker who affects (badly) a French accent, an ancient butler, and a competing suitor. The author has a gentle wit and a passionate, unashamed faith. “A Match for Melissa” is my first Regency from this author but Lord willing it won’t be my last!

So, please give my book a look! Thanks, Susan Karsten

Fault Lines, by Thomas Locke

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I believe this book falls into a category known as speculative fiction–one reviewer called it a psychological thriller, so take your pick. It reads like an action/adventure, but some fantasy is pivotal to the plot. An experimental psychological research program sets off the action. I don’t want to reveal too much, so as not to spoil the readers’ fun as they turn the pages of this uniquely-plotted story.

To enjoy this rollicking adventure, one indeed must suspend disbelief, which isn’t a problem for most readers of this genre. Thomas Locke is a pseudonym for a popular writer named Davis Bunn. The writing is polished, the plot tight, and the characters are realistic and detailed/nuanced.

 

The Gracious woman blog is written by me, Susan Karsten. I am happy to announce that my first novel, “A Match for Melissa”, has been published by Pelican Book Group! It was released to the public on July 7, and is available on Amazon.com, and Barnes & Noble’s website.

Here’s an excerpt from a recent review:

“A Match for Melissa” is a Regency romance. My acquaintance with this genre is limited so I looked it up. To be a real Regency the novel must be set in early 19th century Britain and have a very defined style. A Regency novel will transport the reader back two hundred years so we know how the characters dressed, what their homes looked like and how they socialized. We see a world with clearly defined social classes, morality, manners and conversation.

The author did her homework. “A Match for Melissa” is chockfull of details on life in rural England and upper class London. The characters are delightful. Unless they are bad. (The bad ones are really wonderfully bad.) Melissa is an intelligent woman with an independent bent to her nature who still functions inside the strict rules of protocol for her class. Her father, also independent, but with greater latitude and freedom than a woman, is in charge not only of the family fortune but also the choice of Melissa’s future husband. Much of the tension comes from wondering when Melissa will be able to be matched with the man she really loves.

Plenty of minor characters add flavor and fun and dimension—the English dressmaker who affects (badly) a French accent, an ancient butler, and a competing suitor. The author has a gentle wit and a passionate, unashamed faith. “A Match for Melissa” is my first Regency from this author but Lord willing it won’t be my last!

So, please give my book a look! Thanks, Susan Karsten

Chasing Secrets, by Lynette Eason

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Soon after a dramatic opening scene, we learn that a five-year old Irish child has gone missing for 25 years. It’s not spoiling the story to say that she was considered dead, but is alive and living in the United States…anything more might spoil the story, so get ready for a tale that will provide suspense and romance.

It’s hard to review a book like this without giving away too much of the “fun” because the author jumps right in with heart-stopping action, and intrique. Top that with several possible love interests (who will win fair lady?), and some characters who are not what they seem.

No doubt fans of contemporary romantic suspense will want to place an order for this one!

The Gracious woman blog is written by me, Susan Karsten. I am happy to announce that my first novel, “A Match for Melissa”, has been published by Pelican Book Group! It was released to the public on July 7, and is available on Amazon.com, and Barnes & Noble’s website.

Here’s an excerpt from a recent review:

“A Match for Melissa” is a Regency romance. My acquaintance with this genre is limited so I looked it up. To be a real Regency the novel must be set in early 19th century Britain and have a very defined style. A Regency novel will transport the reader back two hundred years so we know how the characters dressed, what their homes looked like and how they socialized. We see a world with clearly defined social classes, morality, manners and conversation.

The author did her homework. “A Match for Melissa” is chockfull of details on life in rural England and upper class London. The characters are delightful. Unless they are bad. (The bad ones are really wonderfully bad.) Melissa is an intelligent woman with an independent bent to her nature who still functions inside the strict rules of protocol for her class. Her father, also independent, but with greater latitude and freedom than a woman, is in charge not only of the family fortune but also the choice of Melissa’s future husband. Much of the tension comes from wondering when Melissa will be able to be matched with the man she really loves.

Plenty of minor characters add flavor and fun and dimension—the English dressmaker who affects (badly) a French accent, an ancient butler, and a competing suitor. The author has a gentle wit and a passionate, unashamed faith. “A Match for Melissa” is my first Regency from this author but Lord willing it won’t be my last!

So, please give my book a look! Thanks, Susan Karsten

 

 

The Return, by Suzanne Woods Fisher

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Due to the riveting nature of this book’s plot, I had to set it down frequently! Only because it had me at the edge of my seat, and at my age, I can’t take that anymore! 😉

Two heroines, one loves a man, the other is loved by him. The book is set in pre-revolutionary America, during the days of many pioneers making the arduous journey to a new land. A land fraught with danger, but providing religious freedom.

So, this is an Amish fiction book, but not your average cup of tea. It’s quite different, mostly because of its setting. One other unusual feature is that it involves a white Amish woman being held captive by natives. So, there’s that…and if you’ve read some of the real classics with that story element, like Calico Captive, etc., you’re sure to enjoy this entry into the “captive settler” plot club.

The Gracious woman blog is written by me, Susan Karsten. I am happy to announce that my first novel, “A Match for Melissa”, has been published by Pelican Book Group! It was released to the public on July 7, and is available on Amazon.com, and Barnes & Noble’s website.

 Here’s an excerpt from a recent review:

“A Match for Melissa” is a Regency romance. My acquaintance with this genre is limited so I looked it up. To be a real Regency the novel must be set in early 19th century Britain and have a very defined style. A Regency novel will transport the reader back two hundred years so we know how the characters dressed, what their homes looked like and how they socialized. We see a world with clearly defined social classes, morality, manners and conversation.

The author did her homework. “A Match for Melissa” is chockfull of details on life in rural England and upper class London. The characters are delightful. Unless they are bad. (The bad ones are really wonderfully bad.) Melissa is an intelligent woman with an independent bent to her nature who still functions inside the strict rules of protocol for her class. Her father, also independent, but with greater latitude and freedom than a woman, is in charge not only of the family fortune but also the choice of Melissa’s future husband. Much of the tension comes from wondering when Melissa will be able to be matched with the man she really loves.

Plenty of minor characters add flavor and fun and dimension—the English dressmaker who affects (badly) a French accent, an ancient butler, and a competing suitor. The author has a gentle wit and a passionate, unashamed faith. “A Match for Melissa” is my first Regency from this author but Lord willing it won’t be my last!

So, please give my book a look! Thanks, Susan Karsten

A Matter of Trust, by Susan May Warren

Susan Karsten here with another book review.

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Susan May Warren is a best-selling author. She often features unusual settings and unusual careers–if you can call being a snowboarder a career 🙂

What impresses me is the knowledge she brings to her settings. The information about snow, ski venues, mountains, rescue, snowboarding, and so forth is amazing. As you are reading this novel, you will be swept into the scene by the choice details she includes.

For example, in one of the many nail-biting episodes, the reader is taken along to a situation where someone is dangling from a ski-lift. The details of ski-lifts, lift chairs, etc. are all spot-on, and that adds to the suspense.

If you like romantic suspense, and unusual settings/set-ups, this book is for you.

Review by: Susan Karsten, author

The Gracious woman blog is written by me, Susan Karsten. I am happy to announce that my first novel, “A Match for Melissa”, has been published by Pelican Book Group! It was released to the public on July 7, and is available on Amazon.com, and Barnes & Noble’s website.

Here’s an excerpt from a recent review:

“A Match for Melissa” is a Regency romance. My acquaintance with this genre is limited so I looked it up. To be a real Regency the novel must be set in early 19th century Britain and have a very defined style. A Regency novel will transport the reader back two hundred years so we know how the characters dressed, what their homes looked like and how they socialized. We see a world with clearly defined social classes, morality, manners and conversation.

The author did her homework. “A Match for Melissa” is chockfull of details on life in rural England and upper class London. The characters are delightful. Unless they are bad. (The bad ones are really wonderfully bad.) Melissa is an intelligent woman with an independent bent to her nature who still functions inside the strict rules of protocol for her class. Her father, also independent, but with greater latitude and freedom than a woman, is in charge not only of the family fortune but also the choice of Melissa’s future husband. Much of the tension comes from wondering when Melissa will be able to be matched with the man she really loves.

Plenty of minor characters add flavor and fun and dimension—the English dressmaker who affects (badly) a French accent, an ancient butler, and a competing suitor. The author has a gentle wit and a passionate, unashamed faith. “A Match for Melissa” is my first Regency from this author but Lord willing it won’t be my last!

So, please give my book a look! Thanks, Susan Karsten

 

Meet Susan Karsten…

Thank you, Irene!

Irene Onorato

Susan KarstenI’ll admit, when I first joined ACFW (American Christian Fiction Writers) in 2012, and met Susan Karsten through their critique group, I wasn’t sure about linking up with a critique partner who wrote historical romance. After all, I wrote contemporary stuff with Special Forces military men as my heroes, and had a grittier sense of story-telling. But once she and I started trading chapters, I was enthralled with her style and grace in writing.

A Match for MelissaNeedless to say, I’m thrilled to announce the debut of the first book in Susan Karsten’s Honor’s Point Series,A Match for Melissa.Just look at that awesome cover! It’s gorgeous

From the back-cover blurb:  

*Melissa Southwood goes along with her ambitious father’s matchmaking schemes until one event throws all into question.

Amidst balls, carriage rides, dinner parties, and danger, Melissa must navigate an arranged courtship as well as the attentions…

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